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New York Hospitals Face Extreme Conditions

It’s no surprise that the city of New York would be one of the most affected by this crisis, and would suffer the most severe damage from the general design of New York City and the sheer amount of citizens living in a 2.3-mile wide territory. The inevitability of this catastrophic disaster was so abstract that for many, our largest fears surrounding this situation in New York have now been realized. With the exhaustive conditions of overcrowded hospitals and a current death toll of around 2,000 people, New York is by far the most severely hit state by Coronavirus.

Offices

Because these hospitals are so overcrowded, reports and imagery of patient living conditions within the city hospitals are confounding. Images of patient-lined hallways and hospital beds scattered throughout empty floor space in medical centers have many of us wondering what solutions may exist. Unable to enjoy the comforts and privacy of a hospital room, most patients are currently placed wherever there is room available. With the number of cases rising every day, news of nurses and doctors coming to help from neighboring states gives some hope in these dire moments.

 

Creating a healthy hospitalized environment for patients, front-line care workers, families and communities has become our top priority at Space Plus. Within the context of the all-encompassing coronavirus outbreak, we’re now offering our Wellness Walls to accommodate the increased needs for time-sensitive medical facilities, with minimal disruption and no major construction.

office wall partitions

Our Wellness Walls are essentially glass wall partitions that hospitals can install and integrate into the hospital floor plan to create spatial separation and the confinement of patients being treated. These act as small-scale care rooms that can be deployed almost anywhere you have available space. Below is a comprehensive list of all of the potential uses and situations where our Wellness Walls could be deployed.

 

  • Situational waiting rooms
  • Infection control prevention
  • Mitigation Isolation System
  • Protection of Staff
  • Customizable and Convertable (can adjust depending on the number of sick vs. healthy patients)
  • Exam rooms
  • Triage rooms
  • Helps Increase Patient Flow and Available Rooms
  • Isolation rooms (positive and negative pressure)
  • Diagnostic labs
  • Easy to Clean
  • Doctors and Nurses can write on the glass walls (great for indicating arrival times and numbers, as well as labeling immediate attention patients, etc. Can be erased easily)
  • Administration spaces
  • Glass is Impermeable to Infectious Virus
  • Sliding pass-through window great for medications and paperwork
  • Perfect for testing and lab stations
  • Interior construction for temporary facilities
  • Can be installed in unused administration spaces that could be transitioned into overflow areas
  • Existing lower acuity units that could transition to high acuity units

With the integration of glass partitions and wall dividers, hospitals may be able to stabilize and care for all of the incoming patients in need. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo approximates that we have not yet hit the “Apex” of this Virus and that by the end of April we will have reached the high point of the pandemic in New York, with a hopeful drop-off and decline to ensue thereafter. This indicates that the time for action is now and that we are currently in a race against the disease spreading further. Spatial separation is the most crucial element in this process to safeguard our citizens against this deadly virus.

Make your wellness facility as safe as possible for everyone involved. Stop the spread of COVID 19 within hospitals by integrating glass wall partitions and increased patient separation. Visit Space Plus, A Division of the Sliding Door Company online to view our online catalog, and Get a quote from one of our professionals today.

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